REVIEW: Melting Room

Set number:
70801
Release year:
2014
Theme(s):
# of parts:
122
# of figures:
3
RRP
GBP 11.99 / USD 12.99
WARNING: this review may contain content unsuitable for children.

The Build

Unlike many other sets at this price, we’re given just one big build to occupy our time…

Photo of Melting Room

Immediately the “A frame” is put to use by attaching it to the octagonal plate.

Photo of Melting Room

A fixed angle is created by attaching the other end to our 4×6 plate, then adding some fluff and hiding the “A frame”‘s obviousness by using the small curved slopes.
You’ll also notice the 4×4 round plate in Medium Stone Grey being used as the face of the turntable: these plates clip directly to the Black turntable base, and can just as easily be removed.

Photo of Melting Room

As well as adding the two fence parts, we construct this device to place on the turntable, which tilts back and forth.

Photo of Melting Room

This thing right here looks innocent enough when we build it, and could be fashioned into a vehicle as an alternative build if you like – but once the chains are added it takes on a slightly darker meaning.

Photo of Melting Room

The potential vehicle turned torture rack launchpad is added on top of the tilting gadget, with the Trans Red 1×2 plate providing a guide for fitting it. Note that an equally menacing looking Technic gear has been added to the Red axle, to make the rack easier to turn.

Photo of Melting Room

For anyone who doesn’t think there’s enough restraining going on, we also have a handcuff rack to add, complete with handcuffs. You know, for when you want to really hold that sucker down.

Photo of Melting Room

Here we begin to add a control panel, which makes use of the first pair of Black curved slopes. Unlike with the handcuff rack, a hinged brick joins it to the octagonal plate to allow for folding and expansion.

Photo of Melting Room

The main interface makes use of an otherwise useless Black mudguard and printed tile, and attaches to the expandable arm with a hook plate. This means you can turn the interface independently of the arm.

Photo of Melting Room

Finally we can get started on a device even more menacing than the torture rack: the Big Bad Laser. At least, that’s what it looks like it is.
The horse hitching is used as the body of the laser, with all kinds of parts – including a grille 2×2 round brick in Medium Stone Grey – attached to it.

Photo of Melting Room

The brand new hose connects both ends of the body, with one end being inserted directly into the grille round brick, and the other inserted into a Blue Technic half pin that goes inside of the Red hinge.

Photo of Melting Room

The body of the Big Bad Laser hooks on to the expandable arm of the control panel, though you may have some trouble keeping things intact.

Photo of Melting Room

The business end of the laser is mostly constructed from Technic parts, including that elusive transparent belt wheel. Though the use of the Trans Red bar is cool, a short antenna might have been a better choice (in my opinion).

Photo of Melting Room

In any case, the laser attaches to the body using the Black friction pin.

Let the torture commence!